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, it was john lewis and hosea williams who led a group of 600 protesters on a march that started in selma, alabama. we also as americans remember forever selma. but what we remember particularly today about selma is what they were marching for specifically, again, was voting rights. what they were trying to do was march nonviolently this distance, from the city of selma to the state capitol of alabama, to the state capitol, which is montgomery, about 50 miles away. they were stopped that first day when they were trying to march that distance before they ever got out of selma. here, trying to cross the alabama river to get out of town, to get out of selma, the 600 peaceful protesters were met by hundreds of alabama state police and local police. the policemen attacked the protesters. they used tear gas on them. they beat them with billy clubs. the protesters were whipped and stomped on by police horses. the leader of the march, john lewis, took a billy club to the head. he very easily could have died on that bridge that day. 17 of the marchers were sent to the hospital. that happened on su
. but smell that's a moment, too. >> selma is the culmination of the movement marching upward into first of all even to get noticed, to get people to deal with race relations which was scary, people didn't want to deal with it up to birmingham freedom summer and then selma. and i chose here there were three marches, three attempts to march from selma to montgomery. i chose in this book the middle one. which is the one most forgotten. the first one is where they were beaten on bloody sunday, the complicated story. the last one is when they got there. the middle one he was under court order not to march by the federal government, governor wallace was threatening him and trying to trick him into marching, the courts -- all of the branches of government and a movement was divided, people who said don't march before are now saying march hell or high water. he had to decide what to do and it was a moment he went across the bridge and stopped and i say it shows how all the people on all sides of the movement are in perpetual internal conflict over the what the right thing to do is. should we fo
peaceful civil rights marchers were beaten and turned back at the edmund pettus bridge outside selma, alabama. mr. speaker, this weekend a number of us here will be traveling to selma, led by the same man who helped organize those 1965 marches, our friend and colleague, john lewis. an extraordinary historic figure. extraordinary gentle man. but a giant of courage and principle. we are going as part of an annual pilgrimage. remember that day, bloody sunday, march 7, 1965, and the cause for which those brave americans, black and white, risked their lives for political equality and the perfection of our democracy. mr. speaker, i have been privileged to walk with john lewis across that bridge and others, including at least two presidents, for 10 out of the 13 times that john lewis has re-acted that walk. walking in their footsteps is one way to honor that cause. but it is far from the best way. the best way to do it is to carry on their work, to defend and promote the protections included in the voting rights act that they fought so hard to bring about. on wednesday, mr. speaker, the sup
alabama in 1965 for there were three historic march is from selma to the capital montgomery, the first taking place march 7, 1965 and became known as bloody sunday as 600 marchers were attacked by police. within 2500 were forced to turn around after crossing the edmund pettus bridge. we'll hear from dr. king as he successfully crosses the bridge along with thousands of others on the third march, under the watch of federal troops mobilized by president lyndon johnson. finally we will hear dr. king's address in the capital of montgomery. >> we have the right to cross the highway. we have a right to walk to montgomery if our feet can get us there. [applause] we must let the nation know and we must let the world know that it is necessary to protest this three-fold evil. we continue to face it in the most vicious form that we saw last sunday. the attempt to block first amendment privileges. ♪ >> how do you feel about the protection being given you on this march? >> i think this is a real demonstration, a commitment the federal government to protect the constitutional rights of negro citiz
that his father marched from selma to montgomery with martin luther king, jr. today, jackson, jr., told the judge, "i have misled the t american people." here's dean reynolds. >> reporter: jesse jackson, jr., entered the courthouse quickly and then struggled with his emotions inside as he pleaded guilty to charges he spent campaign funds on himself, his family and his house. his wife sandra, a former chicago alderman, also pleaded guilty. as he left court, jackson apologized. >> i'm sorry i let everybody down. >> reporter: jackson's lawyer, reed weingarten, said it was a difficult morning. >> but it was a morning that had to come. jesse needed to come to terms with his misconduct, and those who were in court saw that he did precisely that. >> reporter: david miller is a jackson friend and former state legislator. did you see this coming? >> no, not really. i think it was a surprise to all of us. >> reporter: is there an acute sense of disappointment in that district? >> oh, absolutely. at one point, he was a shining star, young, good looking, articulate. >> reporter: over the las
melissa mc carthy, selma hayek, john travolta and leian nielson. the awards are sunday here on abc 2. it starts at 7:00. if you want the latest on everything oscar, all you have to do is head to our website, we are getting you prepared, go to abc2news.com, finds a there on line. might be a little chilly this morning. >>> it's going to be chilly, looks like the wet weather is going to hold off for the kids. that's good news, especially the wintery mix. this is the school day forecast, we have a temperature coming in 35 degrees, this temperature is much better than what it was yesterday. yesterday, we were in the 20s, not so much for today. as we go through the afternoon, see the temperature coming in 49 degrees, we will have showers, just plain rain showers in to lunchtime for today. by tonight, this is when things will change, we will get clearing in the forecast, it is going to be cold and blustery out there. by tomorrow, temperatures are going to plummet. talking about a high 38 degrees, breezy, it's going to be cold. this is the seven-day forecast for you. as the weather will cont
still just as it guided our fore bearers through seneca falls and selma and stonewall. >> carl rove was wrong. president obama was right. the country is changing. republicans better change with it. joining me now is bob schrum who wrote an article today with the headline "obama realigns the gop declines. and also with me, marie ra theresa. thank you both for joining me. >> bob, in your article today, you wrote "president obama is a transformative figure in a transforming country." you go onto call the gop's 2012 campaign "too white, too old, too rural, too southern." so how has president obama realigned the political interests of the country? >> partly, there have been independent forces out there like changing demographics. but he's recognized that and he ease's appeal to it. and if you look at the cascade of polling, people look at the big philosophical questions. dealing with income. the role of government. economic fairness. equality for women and minorities, incliesiveness and immigration reform. people are ready to go on that march from seneca falls to selma to stone wall and
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to go to selma next week, and he's back in jail. the mountain top is nice, but the valley calls me. that witness, we're blessed by it, but we're unconscious of it. the example by it, the example i want to give you as to how great, i think, the disconnect is is that george wallace who made the speech? 1963 -- made that speech in 1963 could not prevent the tide coming for all of us. if you have a daughter, and you want your daughter to have the whole world open to her, you're daughter and your hopes stand on the shoulders of the civil rights movement. i don't care who you are. all of this happened, but george wallace, while he could not prevent it, was a genius in politics in inventing the phrases that are chillingly contemporary, even today, that when it no longer was respectable to defend segregation, he made it respectable to cuss the process and to play to the fears and the resentments of the process as it was let loose saying that pointy headed bureaucrats were telling us how to run our businesses and where we could go to school, and that they were in kahoots with a bias, nation
witnessing the violent repression of protesters in selma, alabama, that president johnson and congress were moved to act. since then the voting rights acts has stood up as a great legislative and moral achievement in history. on wednesday that achievement faces one of the stiffest test in 50 years as the supreme court begins to hear jor oral arguments that could turn over the law. john, this supreme court case is called shelby county versus holder. it's happening because a county in alabama is challenging the legality of section five of the voting rights act which says nine states and parts of seven others are required to get permission from the justice department before they're able to change their voting laws. these areas are designated because they have a history of racial discrimination at the polls. but shelby county, alabama, among others argue that this history is now in the past. they say section five of the voting rights act is obsolete and the federal government can simply trust them from now on. are they right? >> no, no, they're not right. >> oh, they're not? >> no. this law was
in downtown selma. just eight days later, president lyndon johnson introduced the voting rights act and later on august 6th, 1965 he signed that act into law. >> reverend barber, it is easy for people to embrace the emotion of what it means to have the right to vote and certainly what so many americans went through to get that. a lot of generations today may not appreciate what so many went through. but explain how you feel about the legitimacy of that law in 2013. >> thank you so much. if you see the diversity here as i stand here with the attorney, black and white together, when you look at the law you have to look at it through the continuum of history. in 1868, '72 we had a premeditated attack on voting rights to try to roll them back. 1968 we had a premeditated attack to roll back voting rights. now what we see are premeditated attacks to roll back our voting rights. the only way you can pass stop voter i.d. laws, gerrymandering, redistricting, race based schemes, stop those who want to roll back things like same day registration and early voting you have to have the heart of the voting
and civil rights icon john lewis this weekend. they will visit sites of the famous selma to montgomery march that grew out of the voting rights movement. later that year through the nonviolent work of dr. martin luther king jr. lyndon b. johnson signed the voting rights act of 1965, and a key provision of the all too important law is in jeopardy now. with me is the reverend al sharpton, host of politics nation here on msnbc, plus -- as well as martin luther king iii, president and ceo of martin luther king injury, center for nonviolence, social change. gentlemen, it's great to have you here. mr. king, i want to start with you. both you and the reverend were many the courtroom yesterday, and tom goldstein said that a majority of the court seems committed to invalidating sections -- or invalidating section 5 of the voting rights act and requiring congress to revisit the formula for requiring preclearance of voting changes. the vote seems quite likely to be five to four." again, according to the blog. with the exception of justice scalia's very bold challenge to renewing the voting rights act a
valley towns as reedley, selma, and sanger. and as the landscape wakes up around the area, so does business. take simonian farms, for example. just outside thfrno city limits is where you'll find this 20-acre family owned operation that has grown 100 varieties of fruits and vegetables for more than00 years, and doesn't looc to close shop atime soon. especially if the lion of fans the place has earned over the years has anything to say about it. >> oh, my god. just for people to see it. i don't think they've ever seen anything likthis. toee the beautiful blossoms, and the colors, and thcountryside, and what--what it really takes to doing farming. i mean, i think--god, i just-- i just think they get a lot out ofhis. >> blossoms are one of the most visible signs a new crop is on the way. and for about 6 weeks out of the year, you can see this spectacular sight, trees flushed full of blossoms. some have as many as 20,000 per tree. but the one thing yo discover quite quickly about the blossom trail is, besides highlighting the beauty of the area and the bounty of agriculture the county
, including the march from selma to montgomery lead to the march of 1965. section five of the law requires states and counties to get permission from the federal government before changing any voter rules. a total of nine states are currently subject to section five. in 2006 it was reauthorized for 25 years with overwhelming i bipartisan support, but now a constitutional challenge has put this landmark law in the hands of the roberts court. joining us now is doug kendall, the founder and president of the constitutional accountability center. he comes to us from washington, d.c. welcome to "the war room," doug. >> thanks for having me. >> michael: shelby county alabama, has brought the supreme court challenge to the voting rights act. states like alabama, they say shouldn't be singled out. how do you respond to that? >> well, shelby county is about the last -- shelby county alabama is about the last place in the world that has standing to make that argument. they have been found in violation of the voting right's act innumerable times, and the basic response is while t
the violence that selma where americans were disgusted and they said we shall overcome. that's a different issue and a different time. that's what the president was trying to do with gun control. >> part of the theater of the state of the union evening is that the opposition party doesn't stand and applaud for almost anything that the president talks about and i know both parties do it, but the republican parties had a critical moment. when you have not standing for things like hay quality education and paycheck fairness for women, it hammers home the party of no brand that is not working. where did the tradition come from? does it have any effectiveness at all? >> the most important is television. everyone knows they may be on camera and if you are clapping if are a line in the president's speech and you are a republican, that might be taken as an endorsement. both parties tend to enter on the cautious side and you are right that the a occasions are a rule. >> you can look at the past and the last time a republican party faced a reelected president that was a congress led by newt gingrich
rights act this country isn't ready for it. king went back to selma people came together, the whole country rose up together, it wasn't a majority of the people, but enough, people made it clear they weren't going to go away and within months, the voting rights act was passed. we can do it as engaged americans, but it's not through complacency and 166 it's organizing and mobilizing and all of us coming together. it doesn't have to be under a partisan political party. cenk: rocky, i got to ask you one last question here. that's on the issue of gun control. everybody praised the president for strong words he during the state of the union. you don't agree with that why? >> what did he call for? he took on this sort of preacher persona, and then he played one of the great rhetorical trickion of all time. he never advocated for any particular solution. he kept saying they deserve a vote. they deserve a vote, kept repeating that. he talked about process. he didn't make the case for the kinds of legislative changes that we need in this country and that's just a reflection of how first of a
was at the head of a bloody sunday march in selma, alabama that helped bring about the voting rights act and gave a passioned speech in defense of the law. >> still forces in this country that will want to go back. we are not going back. we need section five and that's why we are here today standing up for the voting rights of all americans. we must never give up. never give in. never give out. >> pete williams has been there all day. pete, for congressman lewis and others, the conservative justices are missing the point that this is not about registration and turn out and polling places being move and other issues. >> for the justices, the question is when the congress reenacted the law of 2006, did it adjust the formula for covering states enough so that it reflects current reality. it's clear that they are concerned that the law is too backwards and doesn't take into account changes today. the liberal justices did their best to defend it and kagan said over half of the discrimination lawsuits come from just those covered states even though they have only about a quarter of the population. the
and women who marched on selma, alabama back in 1965. these peaceful demonstrators were trampled and beaten while they made a statement about equal voting rights for all americans. the man seen here was beaten on the head with a billy club. his skull was fractured and he sustained three fractures. congressman lewis fought to end the days of poll taxes and literacy tests at the voting booth. today he is fighting to make sure those protections stand. >> we've come too far. we made too much progress to go back. the literacy test may be gone. how many bubbles in a bar of soap, how many beans in a jar may be gone. the people are using other means of technique. so we still need section 5. and that's why we're here today, standing up for voting rights of all americans. so we must never give up. >> john lewis and every person in america who believes in equal voting rights must continue the fight. you have to wonder, what is the play here. what is the big picture. what is the big goal. i tell you what, folks. the ultimate goal for republicans is to get the federal government out of the way when it c
king jr. selma voting rights campaign was written on a notebook by her in 1963 as a reaction to the birmingham church bombing. she took it and nagged dr. king until he did it. she had tremendous intellectual influence in expanding the scope and identity of the civil rights movement on several occasions in the 60s. >> there are so many people that we don't know enough, and another member of snick we talked to julian about the fact that people are not learning about this enough right now. i know you've written a condensed volume. is part of that effort to degrees the add generation who don't have time to read the 800 page book, as you said, to try to move this education forward number what is at stake if we don't? >> if we don't learn history we can't learn citizenship on a country that is founded on the notion that our government and our politics is for every citizen. we risk a lot. i'm teaching an experimental course online trying to teach civil rights history to people. i've got people in spain, russia and the solomon islands so i think technology may help, but the fact of t
, we will plan excerpt from the selma. first, we're joined by mumia abu-jamal himself from prison in pennsylvania, not where he was on death row, but -- well, welcome to "democracy now!" tell us where you are. >> good morning. i am in the eastern side of pennsylvania for the first time in a quarter of a century -- actually, more. it is called [indiscernible] i have no idea what it means. it is not far from philadelphia and pretty close to nyc. >> can you tell us what it means to no longer be on death row? >> i could, but i would be lying. i call this slow death row. life in pennsylvania means life. pennsylvania has one of the largest "life" populations of any state in the united states. it had the distinction of having the absolute highest number of juvenile lifers of any state in the united states, indeed, many jurisdictions in the world. that should give you some sense. >> juan, if you'd like to ask mumia abu-jamal a question? >> mumia, i know over the years this enormous putin has developed around the world demanding more freedom and your insisting on the unjust nature of the t
. >> a lot of love for this person. you probably remember her as selma from "good times." she's in our studio to talk about her latest project in our area coming up. >>> still ahead, we have some very healthy reasons for you to enjoy that valentine's day box of chocolates. >> it is the 14th of february. let's see who's celebrating a birthday today. a special happy birthday to our producer oji gleaton. happy birthday fits' your birthday -- >>> welcome back. your weather fir we. had snow north and west of town. it did not stick to the roads. some areas out in loudoun county also had close to an inch. an isolated 2-inch report came out of areas toward caroll county and baltimore county. that's where they got the most. it was a wet snow. the problem is now temperatures have fallen cold enough that we have ice developing in a few hours. it will warm up nicely. 9:00 39. noon 46. we're going to top off at about 51 and a good ride home today. sunny and 49. touch of fog also has developed. we've seen it toward columbia and fort meade. getting a little bit better in new york now. fredricksburg down to
it will work. they'll take a failed system. if you in nebraska or selma, neck and are a hunter or a rancher, if i want to sell you a shotgun or something like that, the federal government, we'll have to go find a dealer, walk into a police station, who will do the check? there will be fees and paperwork and law-abiding people caught up in a bureaucratic nightmare, and, there is going to be abuse in terms of prosecutions. and, it is all going to affect only the law-abiding people them. criminals could care less. >> chris: i want to move on to another subject. what do you make of the picture -- we'll put it on the screen -- the white house released saturday, of president obama skeet shooting at camp david? he says he respects hunting. >> well, the same thing during the campaign, he said to people i will not take away your rifle, shotgun, handgun and, have flyers like this, obama will not take your gun and will protect gun rights, and, now, he's trying to take away all three. i mean -- >> chris: he's not taking away shot guns. >> have you look at the feinstein bill, he is supporting? that is e
) >> brown: in 1965, lewis helped lead 600 people across the edmund pettus bridge in selma, alabama, where police beat them with nightsticks and state troopers fired tear gas. the event became known as "bloody sunday" and proved a tipping point. president lyndon johnson and congress responded with the voting rights act. lawmakers have renewed the law ever since, most recently in 2006, with overwhelming support. but shelby county, alabama says the law has outlived its time. frank ellis is the county attorney. >> we ask for some recognition that we and these other covered jurisdictions have made great strides over the last 48 years. i was 24 years old. i've been the county attorney since 1964. i was 24 years old when we came under section 5. i'm 73 last weekend and we're still under the same formula, none of which has applied to us in many, many, many years. >> brown: president obama has recently voiced support for upholding the voting rights act. he's said that if part of the law is struck down, it will be harder to prevent acts of voting discrimination. the case provoked some tough questio
walking from selma, montgomery to guard the right to vote or what he called the foundation stone. on the hill earlier, chris, lawmakers echoed king saying, to remember, and to keep on walking. a ruling is expected in june. >> we will be watching it. thank you so much, richard. thank you for watching. this wraps up this hour of jansing & company. i'm chris jansing. thomas roberts is up next. >> good morning to you. good morning, everybody. the agenda next hour we'll pick up where you and richard left off with the supreme court right now hearing those arguments over the voting rights act. the justices to watch in this one, roberts and kennedy. and our voting rights experts and nbc news justice correspondent pete williams will join us with developing details from d.c. >>> president obama inviting top congressional leaders on both sides including speaker boehner, nancy pelosi, harry reid, and mitch mcconnell to a meeting at the white house on friday. will the face to face help break the fever over the sequester? we'll take you to rome where the catholic faithful accept the resignatio
, no, we have to go to selma next week. he's back in jail, again. the mountain top is nice, but the valley calls me. that witness, we're all blessed by it, but we're uncshes by it, and the example of it, and the example that i want to give you as to how great i think the disconnect is is that george wallace who made that speech in 196 # could not convince any of the great tides to coming to benefit all of us, if you have a daughter and you want your daughter to have the world open to her, your daughter and hopes are on the shoulders of the civil rights movement. i don'tcare who you are. all of us happen, but george wallace, while he could not prevent it, was a genius in politics in inventing the phrases that are chilling contemporary even today that when it no longer was respectable to defend segregation, he made it respectable to cut the process and play to the fears and resentments of the process as it was let loose saying pointy headed bureaucrats were telling us how to run our businesses and where we could go to school, and that they were in cahoots with a biased, natio
rights march across the bridge in selma. alongside the democratic whip, i am honored to participate in this pilgrimage and reflecting on the sacrifice that shaped the greater democracy we live in today. and with that, mr. speaker, i thank the gentleman and yield back. mr. hoyer: i thank the gentleman for the information. i also thank him for his reference to the march over the bridge, from selma to montgomery. of which we will commemorate. that march occurred on march 7, 1965. yesterday we had the honor of dedicating and accepting a statute in memory -- statue in memory of rosa parks. rosa parks, of course, known as, in many respects, the mother of the civil rights movement that led to america perfecting its union. to allowing and making sure that every american, irrespective of race or color or nationality or religion, could be treated equally. it's appropriate that we participate in this march across the bridge to recall the -- this country's commitment in 1965 to the voting rights act which ensured that every american would have what is intrinsic in the definition of democracy, t
, by making him come here and listen to us. >> others that urned up in that finale was selma -- great show. a lot of money spent on that one as well. on the flip side, state department staffers not going overboard on the budget for hillary clinton's farewell. i mean, come on guys, look at that, a cardboard sign, written in sharpy behind her. budget cuts. here is a cheap way to block out the bad weather. staffers setting up two layers of sandbags to keep the briefing room from flooding during a storm on wednesday. stormy conditions in the briefing room. never. >> well, what i learned making the movie is something that i can i am part and those that watch it that deal with the same thing, can speak about. i'm just lucky to have gotten the opportunity to do the movie and then there's a platform to talk about it. >> oscar nominee, bradley cooper telling the crew of "morning joe," what it's like to raise awareness about veterans with mental illness. he is up for best acting. he and former congressman patrick kennedy recently screened that film for vets at waulter reid hospital. just when you th
to selma. and we will work to get him to say more than just. as i sat at the front of the capitol honored to attend the inauguration holding my daughter's hand, listening to the president, watching that fears bettina sonya sotomayor swearing in the vice-president hearing a more inclusive benediction, being transported by the poetry of richard bagram, a gay cuban immigrant, and, of course, the invitation by civil rights leader, well, let's just say i thought, yes, yes, this is the country are no, this is a country i want my daughter to grow up in. what happened on the steps of the capitol earlier this week was in so many ways remarkable. real change, but it was also made inevitable because of the work queue in this room and many across the country have done for decades. you made that happen. you made those words come out of our presidents mouth. and this year after losing 31 times at the ballot box, 31 times, but who's counting, this year we won big gun marriage. we'd be the opponents in minnesota and maine and maryland and washington state. if you are from those states, stand up and raise
your country can do for you the farther away we get from seneca falls to selma to stonewall the more moved i am. the more i realize that that was a moment, a defining moment in the history of our country where he brought together the new america the new american majority, which is women which is minorities, which now includes the lgbt community. he brought them together and rhetoric matters stephanie. that's the thing that, you know, they say words are not important, they, you know, they're spoken go out in the air, they're gone, but every now and again when a president speaks, and it's few and far between when you have those moments, it changes history and this president did that. stephanie: right but, you know, obviously this is what we're hearing, because this is going to focus more on the economy and jobs than anything else. >> it is. stephanie: again what's going to change? what are we facing now the march 1 deadline for avoiding. >> sequestration. stephanie: right. again, there's mitch mcconnell yesterday, clearly the president wants more revenue for more government he's gotten
. it was about selma and stonewall and, you know, seneca falls, putting him in the social justice movement. i think this one is down to business. i mean, he's got to deal with these economic crisis at hand. so it's really about what do we do to jump-start the economy more right now. i think it's less of a legacy speech than a way to motivate the american public. and the only indicator we're going to have is what kind of rise he gets in the, um, polls. and also marco rubio tonight making the response. many people think he's a potential front runner for the republican nomination in 2016. so i think that listening to rubio will be of great interest also. arthel: okay. well, we will be watching. douglas brinkley, thank you very much for your time this morning. >> thank you. arthel: yeah. jon: the young ads woman who admits -- arizona woman who admits stabbing and shooting her boyfriend to death is back on the stand today. the question is, why did she do it? the latest from the jodi arias murder trial just ahead. >>> plus, more than $16 trillion in debt and counting, does the government have a spe
: it was interesting in the inaugural address president obama put selma and stonewall in the same sentence, right making the point you've made. it is all part -- continuation, if you will, of the same movement. so it is like there's no rest for the weary. you come right off the football field and you jump into getting your mba at george washington university. a special program there. tell us about it. >> it is the star mba program. i'm in the inaugural class. we started in 2011. now we're going to be wrapping up in 2013. but you know with all of the customized educations and being a professional athlete we have to have a really customized schedule. if you want to go to school and you want to have a hire education and a personal learning experience, then you have to find a place that's going to have a customized -- education for you and where you can really benefit. so the schedule is tailored around our nfl schedule so we do all of our classes during the off-season and there are also some online courses during the season but it is such a huge difference to be able to sit in the classroom and get
the civil rights leaders congressman john lewis who was beaten in selma, alabama, who was 1965 in a march for voting rights. joe johns, cnn, washington. >>> coming up next, she landed a vault that will go down in olympic history, helped her team win the gold, mckayla maroney is here, find out how impressed she is with her new job. did you know not all fiber is the same? citrucel is different- it's the only fiber for regularity that won't cause excess gas. it's gentle and clinically proven to help restore and maintain regularity. look for citrucel today. [ whirring ] [ creaking ] [ male announcer ] trophies and awards lift you up. but they can also hold you back. unless you ask, what's next? [ zapping ] [ clang ] this is the next level of performance. the next level of innovation. the next rx. the f sport. this is the pursuit of perfection. >>> u.s. olympic gymnast mchalela maroney became an intenet sensation after her not impressed face went viral. photographed on the medal podium giving a brief look of disappointment after she earned a silver medal in the vaults but her real claim to fam
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